Friday the 13th Part 1 & 2

And in the end Friday the 13th isn’t doing anything wildly new. It’s repackaging a known commodity for a generation of teenagers that had become numb to big screen horrors anesthetized for their entertainment. Halloween¬†updated tropes by bringing terror to suburban teenagers. And while John Carpenter’s film sold legitimate white-knuckle tension and masked most of the overt horror — Friday the 13th upped the ante. Minimal story, maximum horror.

31 Days of Horror: 2016 Shame-a-thon

For the past few years, I’ve gathered the fearless masses during these pre-Halloween weeks, encouraging them to indulge in a horror movie shame-a-thon, sponsored by Cinema Shame. The notion was simple. List 31 unseen horror movies you feel obligated to watch and tackle as many as you can during the …

May Shame: So Deliverance is, like, ohmigod, so Deliverance

That looming specter of “manhood” hovers over the entire movie. The perceived macho manhood of the sleeveless and ripped outdoorsman in Burt Reynolds. The lack thereof in the fragile renaissance man and banjo plucker Ronny Cox. The insecure chubby guy who overcompensates for a lack of confidence by emulating Burt Reynolds. And Jon Voight — the rational skeptic, the everyman, the eyes through which the audience watches the film. And then there’s that pesky issue of rape — a notion inextricably tied with the abuse and destruction of hyper-masculinity.