Of [In]human Bond[age]: Skyfall and the Question of Spacetime

Taken at face value, however, James Bond’s cinematic escapades in international espionage are a collection of stories taken from the career of one man. Independent scholars John Griswold and Henry Chancellor have taken it upon themselves to assemble the original Ian Fleming novels into chronological order based on the events contained within. The films, however, prove more problematic. If the latest, excellent entry into Bond’s resume, Skyfall, has cemented one notion about chronology it is that the Bond films cannot be treated as isolated escapades along an individual timeline. Not even suspension of disbelief can atone for Skyfall’s temporal incongruities (even within the movie itself). Must we then consider the Bond series as multiple serials distinguished only by the actor playing the role? (Also made problematic by recurring, self-referential leitmotifs.) Or is it something more complicated, like the intertwining plots of a collection of linked short stories with no particular start or finish?

Getting back into the ring: Sony bets big on the Vita

Taking a $2.9 billion loss is like taking a punch from Mike Tyson. Ask Michael Spinks if he felt $2.9 billion lighter after his introduction to Tyson’s left hook. Only Michael Spinks wasn’t expected to get back in the ring. Sony not only has to get back in the ring, they’re expected to return with all their faculties in check and retake the Heavyweight crown after four consecutive years of brutal industry pummeling rather than just 88 seconds.

The effect of the creative technologist

A lot of “creatives” are the learned, but not necessarily productive workplace fodder Clark depicts – but on the other hand a lot of heavily trained coders and programmers and businesspeople contribute immediate results but hinder growth. It’s not about the title on their degree or their perceived niche in the workforce; it’s about the skills of the individual.