A Response to all the MFA Curmudgeony

The interwebs have been abuzz (in certain circles – not the normal world, of course, since everyone else is busy discussing important things like maybe Occupy Wall St.) with furor over MFA rankings published in the Sept/Oct issue of Poets & Writers. After all, bloggers are generally writers and because we’re writers we have things to say about everything. Of course the masses would take arms against their supposed oppressors. As an MFA graduate myself, I’d been non-stop furious for weeks now. Okay, actually I’ve been entirely disinterested in the rankings. Nothing more than noise. Poets & Writers had decided to fill a void of information. MFA programs flourish in my mind due to two factors: reputation and location. I wanted to go to school in Maine so I did. If P&W wanted to attempt to make something official so be it. Was my school even ranked? I don’t remember. I checked the list out of mild curiosity before placing that issue along with my other writing mags in the basket next to the toilet. I’ve not been ignorant of the rumblings but they haven’t interested me. Until I stumbled across a blog post by the managing editor of the Missouri Review. Continue reading A Response to all the MFA Curmudgeony

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Fear the Page

I haven’t written anything in almost a month. Not one word of a story, novel or blog post. I’m not afraid of the blank page. We’re just not really speaking.

I had a memoir/creative non-fiction piece published in the excellent Specter Literary Magazine last week. (Find it here: http://www.spectermagazine.com/lit/prose/james-patrick) A story that means quite a bit to me, that took me a long time to craft and mold into the story it is today. I’m very proud of that story. Still this relative success has not inspired me to tackle any of the projects in my head. Continue reading Fear the Page

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30Hertz Recommended: September

So so so so so much new music has come out within the past month. I needed to highlight the ones deemed 30Hz Recommended.  I’m not going to spend a crap-ton of time doing this because there’s bad new TV to watch this week (and then immediately dismiss). Also I’m going to poo poo a popular pick because I’m the one with the microphone and I don’t care what Pitchfork thinks. Continue reading 30Hertz Recommended: September

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Turntabling

No recent Internet time suck has sucked more time than Turntable.fm. And by sucked I mean consumed my idle and active click time. The beauty of the website/community is that it can provide a constant soundtrack to your day in the micro-genre of your choosing. At work. At home. Really whenever you’re at a computer (or soon an iPhone and iPad). You can be a zombie and just absorb the tunes or participate by chatting about music or stepping up to the decks to spin your own favorite tracks. Continue reading Turntabling

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Lost Bands of the 80’s: Two People

As I browsed through a few hundred songs in a file of rare 80’s tracks I downloaded this week (courtesy of a guy on Pirate Bay that posts thousands of rare 80’s cuts) I came across the song “This is the Shirt.” Now, the name of the song itself begs a listen. This Is the Shirt.

“This is the shirt that she wore when it was good, good, good.” Continue reading Lost Bands of the 80’s: Two People

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A bl-g about classic and not-so-classic movies, music and nostalgia by James David Patrick