Thirty Hertz Rumble

A bl-g about movies, music and nostalgia by James David Patrick

Category: 31 Days of Horror 2016 (Page 3 of 6)

31 Days of Horror: Tremors / Tremors 2

tremors 31 days of horror

31+ Days of Horror. 33 Horror Movies. 33 Reviews. Hooptober Challenges and Bonus Tasks.
View my 2016 Cinema Shame/Hoop-Tober Watch Pile Shame-a-thon Statement here.

Nature of Shame:
Long overdue rewatch on Blu-ray / Unseen sequels

Hoop-tober Challenge Checklist:
Decade – 1990’s
Crazy Animal Movie
Franchise


 

#20. Tremors (1990)

 

tremors poster

 

I hold Tremors up as the pinnacle of modern creature features. After watching Komodo last weekI felt compelled to conclude the “Crazy Animal Movie” requirement of the Hooptober Challenge with this old favorite. I’ve owned the Tremors Attack Pack Blu-ray release for a few years now and I’ve failed, despite my intentions, to watch Tremors each of the past two Halloweens. I’d had it up to here with lackluster animal movies. Killerfish, Day of the Animals, Komodo — all of these films have only reinforced my aggravation over lazy savage animal movies.

I couldn’t decide if fictional animals counted towards the requirement, but I decided I didn’t care either. These were animals. They were crazy. Bring on the big ass worms.

 

31 days of horror tremors

 

Tremors works because it embraces the historical absurdity of the animal attack genre. Giant Leeches. Slugs. Killer shrews. You name the creature, it’s attacked people on cinema. With an eye on a retro-brand of filmmaking and a nod toward self-awareness, director Ron Underwood downplays terror in favor of spectacle and humor. In the place of exposition or a brief origin story, Tremors substitutes ecological wonder. Characters marvel at the existence of the Graboids, their physiological adaptations that have allowed them to exist undetected in the earth for millions of years.

They might want to eat you, but by god that’s an impressive specimen! Check out those independently operated tongue snakes! And spikes that allow them to push themselves through the dirt!

Impressive creature effects only carry a film so far. The tone of the film must reflect the creatures themselves. First, the creatures cannot be the joke. While the face-value of Tremors suggests otherwise, (giant carnivorous worms!) the Graboids never become the punchline. The high-concept narrative allows the tremendous, entertaining collection of character actors to act and react to a preposterous scenario. An isolated Nevada town under siege by subterranean monsters. A pair of mostly capable handymen, a geologist and a right-wing gun nut hold the fort.

 

tremors 31 days of horror

 

Kevin Bacon, Fred Ward, Michael Gross, Reba McEntire and Victor Wong (Big Trouble in Little China) buy in completely. (Though, Kevin Bacon has confessed that at the time he felt the film represented a career low.) With the worms presented as the Abbott to the humans’ Costello, the creatures can afford to just be monstrous. The rest of the humor comes naturally.

I might be blinded by irrational love for Tremors because it’s really not actually quite that good… but I’d be lying if I gave it anything short of five Hertzies.

 

30Hz Movie Rating:

30hzrating5

 

So what would happen to this balance when the sequel loses its director and goes direct-to-video six years later?

 

#21. Tremors 2: Aftershocks (1996)

 

tremors 2

 

The film carries on.

The budget has been noticeably downgraded. The worms lose their independently operating snake-tongues and most of the special effects involve fountains of exploded worm goo. The actors outside Ward and Gross barely passed the “acting their way out of a paper bag” test. Chris Gartin replaces Kevin Bacon with a less mature version of Bacon’s already immature character and he’s only mostly annoying. Gartin comes around by the end of the movie but still reminds me of a low-rent Justin Bartha. Michael Gross inflates the NRA survivalist persona, filling up some of the personality vacancy.

 

tremors 2 31 days of horror

 

Fans of the original will find enjoy #2. Aftershocks finds new creative ways to attack with worms. Recommended. Even the wife got into this one. Extra half star because reasons.

 

30Hz Movie Rating:

30hzrating31-2

Tremors blu-rayAvailability: All four Tremors flicks can be had on the cheap. No excuse.

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Earlier 2016 31 Days of Horror entries: #1. Vampyros Lesbos / #2. A Chinese Ghost Story / #3. The Haunting of Morella / #4. Delirium (1972) / #5. A Lizard in a Woman’s Skin / #6. She-Wolf of London / #7. Son of Frankenstein / #8. Killerfish / #9. The Bride of Re-Animator / #10. A Bay of Blood / #11. The Seventh Victim / #12. The Fly (1958) / #13. The Fly (1986) / #14. Deep Red / #15. Dracula’s Daughter / #16. Day of the Animals / #17. The Unknown / #18. Kuroneko / #19. Komodo

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31 Days of Horror: Komodo (1999)

komodo 31 days of horror

31+ Days of Horror. 33 Horror Movies. 33 Reviews. Hooptober Challenges and Bonus Tasks.
View my 2016 Cinema Shame/Hoop-Tober Watch Pile Shame-a-thon Statement here.

Nature of Shame:
Unseen DVD

Hoop-tober Challenge Checklist:
Decade – 1990’s
Crazy Animal Movie


 

#19. Komodo (1999)

Komodo poster

 

 

I’m entertained by the subtle ways I change the format of these posts. Each and every change I’ve made over the course of 19 posts wouldn’t even be noticed by the average reader. Hell, forget the average reader. If some person existed that made a sick point to read every one of these 31 Days of Horror posts, even they wouldn’t notice the differences. Give up? I centered the film title and poster. Swell, huh? (Help me. I’m losing my mind.)

But about Komodo.

Komodo belongs to the animal attack subsection of the horror genre. More specifically, the sub-sub-genre of animal attack movies where the attacking animal manifests as something innately toothless. The creature itself doesn’t have to be toothless, though that certainly solidifies its sub-sub-genre status. See: Slugs, Swarm, Night of the Lepus. You get the picture. Komodo falls into this category despite having a potentially monstrous killer creature.

 

komodo 1999

 

Komodo dragons rule the isolated ecosystems in which they live — the tippy top of the food chain. They’re believed to be ancient lizards, dating back almost 4million years. The only species of these giants left on the planet. It was once believed that the komodo caused sepsis in its prey due to saliva highly concentrated with bacteria; however, recent studies from 2013 have shown that the bacteria resembles the saliva of just about any obligate carnivore. Myth in this instance proves more potent than fact. Even though the movie takes advantage of this sepsis/paralysis myth, it fails to render this trait — something that could have been used to foster some legitimate terror — as anything more than a footnote.

The film arrived in 1999 as part of the straight-to-video glut of creature features that took advantage of newly inexpensive CGI effects. Considering the film’s budget, the komodo effects — a mix of practical puppetry for close ups and CGI — become the movie’s one legitimate strength. Director Michael Lantieri (Jurassic Park‘s creature creator) has a good sense to withhold a full appearance of the dragons to maximize later utility. Though here’s the rub. Despite the komodo’s size and supposed paralytic saliva, they’re really not an inherently frightening animal. In order to turn them monstrous, Komodo‘s komodos become killing machines as a result of experimental hormone therapy.

The PG-13 rating prevents much bloodletting and discourages brutality that could have better established these hormone-laden killing machines. Even without knowing Lantieri’s connection to Jurassic Park, viewers will note a number of regurgitated setpieces and scenarios refashioned on a smaller Komodo/direct-to-video scale.

 

komodo 1999

 

Final Thoughts:

Is there a reason to watch Komodo? No. Not really. Creature feature aficionados usually skew towards the more kitschy variety of films produced in the 1950’s and 60’s. Late 1990’s CGI with an $11million budget doesn’t generally wind their clock. With this kind of sub-sub-genre toothless creature attack DNA, Komodo needed to be less competent to be truly notable.

 

30Hz Movie Rating:

30hzrating2
Komodo dvdAvailability: Get your Komodo fix. 

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Earlier 2016 31 Days of Horror entries: #1. Vampyros Lesbos / #2. A Chinese Ghost Story / #3. The Haunting of Morella / #4. Delirium (1972) / #5. A Lizard in a Woman’s Skin / #6. She-Wolf of London / #7. Son of Frankenstein / #8. Killerfish / #9. The Bride of Re-Animator / #10. A Bay of Blood / #11. The Seventh Victim / #12. The Fly (1958) / #13. The Fly (1986) / #14. Deep Red / #15. Dracula’s Daughter / #16. Day of the Animals / #17. The Unknown / #18. Kuroneko

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31 Days of Horror: The Unknown

the unknown 1927 31 days of horror

31+ Days of Horror. 33 Horror Movies. 33 Reviews. Hooptober Challenges and Bonus Tasks.
View my 2016 Cinema Shame/Hoop-Tober Watch Pile Shame-a-thon Statement here.

Nature of Shame:
Didn’t-think-I’d-seen-it-but-I’d-totally-seen-it Shame

Hoop-tober Challenge Checklist:
Decade – 1920’s
Silent


 

The Advance Word: It was on the DVR and Joan Crawford.

#17. The Unknown (1927)

the unknown 1927 lobby card

I’d planned to rewatch Jean Epstein’s La chute de la maison Usher for the “silent movie” requirement of the Hoop-Tober 3.0 Challenge but one night I was in bed, skimming the DVR for a movie to watch and I found that I’d set this to record from TCM. I often watch silent or foreign movies in bed at night because I can keep the volume down so not to disturb Mrs. 30Hz — who actually likes going to sleep at a relatively reasonable hour. The Unknown checked off a couple of CinemaShame/Hoop-Tober challenge boxes so I ran with it. I actually don’t own any unwatched silent horror films. Hurray for small victories.

Oh, hey, by the way… you’ve seen this movie before, knucklehead.

This brand of shame turned out to be something entirely different. I have a weird vault-like memory for recalling exactly when and where and with whom I first saw a movie. I assume this vault is taking up space that could have been helpful during high school trigonometry or that Java class I almost failed in college. The Unknown, true to title, escaped cataloging.

the unknown 1927 joan crawford

One should remember Lon Chaney throwing knives at 22-year-old gypsy Joan Crawford with his toes. Even once the trace memory kicked in, I kept watching. I couldn’t look away. Lon Chaney’s performance in The Unknown is haunting. ‘The Man of a Thousand Faces” created a pitiable villain of disarming obsession and enviable passion.

Chaney plays Alonzo, a double-thumbed murderer hiding among circus “freaks” by pretending he has no arms. He falls in love with the gypsy girl Estrellita. Estrellita, however, is also coveted by Malabar the Strong Man. She cowers at his musclebound touch and laments the men that always want to touch her.  Malabar’s not a bad guy; he’s just a broheim that’s clumsy with affection. Meanwhile, Alonzo waxes Estrellita’s father when he uncovers Alonzo’s true identity. Estrellita turns to Alonzo for comfort, the man without arms and without groping paws. She repeatedly talks about how amazing it would be to love a man without hands.

Alonzo tries to raise his hand. To say “ME!” ME, PLEASE!” but of course his hands are tied… our at least bound in a corset. To get that close to Estrellita, to embrace Estrellita he’d need to do away with those pesky appendages once and for all.

So he does.

the unknown lon chaney

 

Maybe that doesn’t sound especially unnerving. Maybe that sounds like a bunch of silly silent movie hyperbole… but in the hands of Tod Browning, that silly little slice of hyperbole left me unsettled all over again. I’d forgotten about the amputation. Consider the special brand of obsession that must incite someone to remove body parts. Lon Chaney lays bare every ounce of Alonzo’s emotional anguish and moral ambivalence.

The choice to amputate perfectly good arms, as it does, backfires. When Alonzo returns to the circus, he finds that Estrellita has fallen in love with the hamfisted Malabar and he’s arrived just in time to attend their wedding. Alonzo snaps and plots his final revenge.

 

triple facepalm

The Unknown serves as a direct precursor to Browning’s more famous outing: 1932’s Freaks (which also includes the love triangle between a circus freak, a beauty and a strong man). The thematic reliance upon circus and carnival acts was no happenstance. Browning himself ran away to join the circus at 16. During those early years in show business, he worked a carnival “talker,” performed in his own act billed as the “Living Corpse,” and clowned around with Ringling Brothers. Not until he met D.W. Griffith at a variety theater in New York City, did Tod Browning venture into filmmaking. (He’s an extra in Intolerance, by the way.)

While Freaks is perhaps more unsettling in its own visceral way, The Unknown proves to be the more successful film overall due to Lon Chaney’s singular performance. Contemporary reviews likened the film to “a visit to the dissection room at the hospital.” Undoubtedly, Browning’s film ventures into uncomfortable territory but our modern sensibilities should be sturdier than that of a 1927 cinema critic.

While Browning’s story maintains that same disturbing sense of macabre drama, our 2016 sensibilities will be drawn (and quartered — you’ll understand if you watch the film) to the early notions of gender politics and sexual harassment. The love triangle where the “hot” girl chooses the insensitive “jock” over the “weird” guy remains timeless social dynamism.

And with that I’ll move on to some actual Watch Pile shame. Time is running low, and these movies aren’t watching themselves.

 

the unknown 1927

Final Thoughts:

Joan Crawford at 22 doesn’t come with the crazy eyes. Who knew? (Well, technically I did… because I’d seen this before, but that’s beside the point.)

 

30Hz Movie Rating:

30hzrating4

 

 


lon chaney collection dvdAvailability:
 The Unknown can be found on TCM’s Lon Chaney Collection DVD set. 

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Earlier 2016 31 Days of Horror entries: #1. Vampyros Lesbos / #2. A Chinese Ghost Story / #3. The Haunting of Morella / #4. Delirium (1972) / #5. A Lizard in a Woman’s Skin / #6. She-Wolf of London / #7. Son of Frankenstein / #8. Killerfish / #9. The Bride of Re-Animator / #10. A Bay of Blood / #11. The Seventh Victim / #12. The Fly (1958) / #13. The Fly (1986) / #14. Deep Red / #15. Dracula’s Daughter / #16. Day of the Animals

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31 Days of Horror: Day of the Animals

31 days of horror day of the animals

31+ Days of Horror. 33 Horror Movies. 33 Reviews. Hooptober Challenges and Bonus Tasks.
View my 2016 Cinema Shame/Hoop-Tober Watch Pile Shame-a-thon Statement here.

Nature of Shame:
Unwatched Scorpion DVD Blu-ray

Hoop-tober Challenge Checklist:
Decade – 1970’s
Animals Gone Wild


 

The Advance Word: The narrow sub-genre of “conservation horror” offers a narrow bandwidth of thrills. I expect animals to attack people and people to react like idiots.

day of the animalsday of the animals

#16. Day of the Animals (1977)

 

The challenges for El Cinemonster’s Hoop-Tober 3.0 included watching three “Animals Gone Wild” movies. It’s not my favorite genre, but maybe I just haven’t seen the right flicks. Unlike the laundry list of werewolf movies that disappoint me at every turn, I’ve only seen a couple of films belonging to this sub-genre of horror. The Blu-ray.com forum switchboard lit up when Scorpion announced Day of the Animals on Blu-ray. I get sucked into these vortexes of nostalgic appreciation and therefore ordered my own copy.

What am I missing, folks?

day of the animals

I’m unaware if the vultures are killing this woman or the chroma-key technology.

The basic tenent of the sub-genre —  humans are horrible creatures that can’t help but destroy nature and now nature is taking its pound of flesh — makes perfect sense. I see these films as the global warming equivalent of Godzilla (1954). Godzilla came to be in the wake of nuclear fallout. Day of the Animals came to be in the wake of conservation awareness. Who got the short end of the stick here?

City folk go camping, become the prey for mountain lions, bears, vultures, snakes, hawks, etc. Hardly any difference between this and a healthy bit of slashing… except for one main aesthetic issue. Most of Day of the Animals takes place in daylight. And it’s not scary. Okay. It’s not even, like, tense. In fact it’s sooooo not tense that it’s funny, right down to its simple shots of bloodthirsty critters staring off in the distance and absorbing all that excess UV light that’s making them violently aggressive. When Day of the Animals first showcased some vultures staring down with obvious ill intent, I just couldn’t…

Low budget horror films embrace darkness. Darkness provides cheap thrills and masks sparse sets, cheap costumes, crappy gore effects, and so on and so forth. That Day of the Animals takes place predominantly during the day means that these special effects, like matting and forced perspective have nowhere to hide.

Day of the Animals

Hey, girl.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m down with crappy movies. So down. Day of the Animals, however, presents itself straight, no chaser. In fact, at one point, it almost convinced me that its aim was higher than that of the B-/C+ student that giggles at penis jokes in math class. I blame Lalo Schifrin. I don’t get to say that very often because Lalo’s a sonic f’ing master of cinematic jams. Sample “Frances’ Theme” from the Day of the Animals:

A solid score legitimizes bad cinema. If you have someone like Lalo Schifrin scoring your film, you have expectations. The $1.2million budget also suggests expectation. And I’m forced to ask: What’s your ambition, Day of the Animals? Your animal attacks offer high comedy, not suspense. All these humans are terrible. Good riddance. We’re rooting for the animals. Is that the thrill? Animalistic role playing? Are we actually embracing our inner Furry?

The inarguable climax of the movie takes place when shirtless Leslie Nielsen wrestles a bear… with fifteen minutes left in the film. This is the reason to watch Day of the Animals. Something less than 30 seconds of cinema. I know what you’re thinking. “Don’t I need the character development? The turn of events that leads to this moment?”

No. You don’t, so don’t clutter the image with backstory.

You just need to know that a shirtless Leslie Nielsen gets charged by a bear… and he charges back… and then the combatants embrace in a battle to the death. I’m forced to consider whether modern audiences have embraced this film more so than contemporary critics due to the incongruous appearance of Leslie Nielsen as an executive/hiker/rapist/bear brawler. Certainly fans weaned on his later-career comic films would find this sort of absurdity anomalous.

day of the animals leslie nielsen

Final Thoughts:

Progressive 1977 notions of global warming and conservation aside, Day of the Animals succeeds in offering little more than ironic entertainment (that vulture attack, tho!) and the reinforcement of my own personal belief that camping really sucks.

 

30Hz Movie Rating:

30hzrating2

 

LESLIE NIELSEN FIGHTING A BEAR! Rating:

30hzrating5

 

day of the animals blu-rayBlu-ray Verdict: I might keep it as a curiosity, but I feel bad depriving a Day of the Animals lover of their right to own this excellent Blu-ray release.

Availability: Scorpion’s Day of the Animals Blu-ray is Out of Print, but a DVD version remains available.

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Earlier 2016 31 Days of Horror entries: #1. Vampyros Lesbos / #2. A Chinese Ghost Story / #3. The Haunting of Morella / #4. Delirium (1972) / #5. A Lizard in a Woman’s Skin / #6. She-Wolf of London / #7. Son of Frankenstein / #8. Killerfish / #9. The Bride of Re-Animator / #10. A Bay of Blood / #11. The Seventh Victim / #12. The Fly (1958) / #13. The Fly (1986) / #14. Deep Red / #15. Dracula’s Daughter

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31 Days of Horror: Dracula’s Daughter

dracula's daughter 31 days of horror

31+ Days of Horror. 33 Horror Movies. 33 Reviews. Hooptober Challenges and Bonus Tasks.
View my 2016 Cinema Shame/Hoop-Tober Watch Pile Shame-a-thon Statement here.

Nature of Shame:
Unseen Universal Horror

Hoop-tober Challenge Checklist:
Decade – 1930’s
Pre-1970


 

The Advance Word: Uh. Dracula sequel. About his daughter maybe? That’s my guess anyway. Though, after She-Wolf of London, I take nothing for granted.

Dracula's Daughter poster

#15. Dracula’s Daughter (1936)

 

Any assessor of Dracula’s Daughter must approach the film from three distinct angles. First, at face value. Dracula’s Daughter is a toothless lark of a “sequel.” The film talks too much and shows too little to engage the viewer at the level of primordial terror. Despite the sluggish pacing of Dracula (1931), Bela Lugosi’s Dracula still conveyed a consistent sense of dread.

The second angle of assessment, as with any of these films from the Universal horror cycle, lies in the success of the film’s visuals. These films no longer maintain the power of fright. They’ve long since assumed the role of spectacle. Chiaroscuro and fascinating gothic imagery.

Dracula’s Daughter differs from most of the horror pictures of its day because it places a woman in the central role (we shall not return to the silly She-Wolf of London — that trifle has no bearing on this conversation). As a result, we have the benefit of viewing the film in the context the entire Universal horror cycle. How does foregrounding a woman change the film’s approach to the “monstrous”?

 

dracula's daughter

I want to consider Gloria Holden herself. Holden assumes the “Dracula” role in this sequel and reportedly wanted nothing to do with the role. She’d just signed a new contract with Universal and Carl Laemmle immediately thrust the actress into Dracula’s Daughter as Countess Marya Zaleska. It was common to view these horror films as lesser art, but Holden had also seen how playing Dracula had typecast Bela Lugosi. With this in mind, it’s no stretch to view Holden’s performance as the product of an actress seething with distaste.

If Holden’s low opinion of the role had indeed seeped into her performance, this trait only benefitted her character. Countess Marya longs to be free from the curse of Dracula. She presumes that burning the body of Count Dracula will cause her to become human. (Sidenote: the funeral pyre marks the only appearance or Lugosi in the film — he contributed only his visage via a wax cast, despite originally being cast in the film.) When she does not return to the land of the living, she becomes hateful, desperate and disillusioned. An ideal situation for an actress that didn’t want to be there in the first place. Happy accidents.

dracula's daughter

Director Lambert Hillyer (director of the first Batman serial) cloaked Holden in shadow, embracing the unique contours of her porcelain face. Holden’s Countess Marya Zaleska drips with gothic sexuality. Viewing the film as an exploration of repressed female sexuality or even homosexuality creates layers of intrigue. Even the film’s cornball poster tagline (see above) suggests a kind of taboo sexuality: “She gives you that weird feeling!” (Emphasis on “weird” my own.)

To explore my homosexuality observation, I went to Google and typed in “Dracula’s Daughter homosexuality.” Clearly, I’m not alone with this bit of theorizing. In fact, I’m just plain late to the party. Anne Rice named a bar in he novel Queen of the Damned after the film, as an homage to homoerotic vampirism. Even the typically dense Joseph Breen of the Production Code Administration noted the troublesome subtext of a specific scene between the Countess and a woman she coerces into modeling for her. (She’s a painter, you see.) The film’s been featured in books on queer cinema. Even contemporary reviews cited Zaleska’s notable eye for young girls. I’m barely scratching the surface on the published material discussing this matter. I didn’t think I’d had an original thought, but goddamn, Internet, thanks for making me feel remedial.

dracula's daughter

The Countess hovers over Janet. Her presence isn’t that of a grotesque killer, but of a lover.

 

During my viewing of Dracula’s Daughter, I couldn’t help but think of Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla, the I Ching of female vampirism, which provided the springboard for films such as Hammer’s The Vampire Lovers and Dreyer’s Vampyr (though Dreyer’s film eliminates all sexual connotations). The connection appears purely superficial. Carmilla stands out as the first example of the lesbian vampire trope in literature, Dracula’s Daughter as the first in cinema.

I don’t doubt that Hillyer took advantage of the titillating subtext; however, Dracula’s Daughter resorts to a sort of button-down version of lesbianism in the face of certain Production Code censorship and culturally accepted notions of gender identity.

Dracula’s Daughter never shows the Countess in the act of vampirism. Holden’s vampire never advances upon her prey for a nibble. She merely entraps. Predation, but never the kill. While Lugosi’s Dracula also never drank blood on screen, the actor inhabited a monster that most surely partook off-screen. Holden inhabits a bored noblewoman of leisure. Women weren’t killers. Women were lovers. And sexual women were not to be openly discussed.

dracula's daughter

Social constraints also dictated that a man couldn’t have been the prey of a female vampire. Women could be in distress. Women could be victims. Dracula’s Daughter, by placing a female as the central vampire, forced itself into the realm of de facto queer cinema. Society dictated that although women could be predators, they could also only prey on other women. The male lead, psychiatrist Dr. Jeffrey Garth (Otto Kruger), becomes Countess Zaleska’s commodity, hope for a cure to her vampirism (aka lesbianism), but never the subject of her predation.

Before I start in on that last connection about “curing homosexuality” through psychiatry, I’m going to bring this bit of dialogue to a close.

The End.

 

Final Thoughts:

Dracula’s Daughter offers so much food for thought during it’s meager 72 minute runtime that you’ll refuse the dessert course. Gloria Holden’s timeless beauty and drastic chiaroscuro prove to be a match made in cinematic heaven. Watch Dracula’s Daughter for the stunning visuals, observe the ways that the film toys with the notion of homosexuality and specifically female homosexuality. The uneven and sometimes clunky narrative doesn’t do the film itself any favors.

 

 

30Hz Movie Rating:

30hzrating31-2

 


dracula complete legacy collectionDVD Verdict:
 I need to see this on Blu-ray. While the print appears to be great shape on this Dracula: Complete Legacy Collection set, the deep blacks would benefit from greater 1080p detail. It should be a stunner.

Availability: Dracula’s Daughter is available on the Complete Legacy Collection DVD set. I assume a Blu-ray version will follow sometime around this time next year. 

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Earlier 2016 31 Days of Horror entries: #1. Vampyros Lesbos / #2. A Chinese Ghost Story / #3. The Haunting of Morella / #4. Delirium (1972) / #5. A Lizard in a Woman’s Skin / #6. She-Wolf of London / #7. Son of Frankenstein / #8. Killerfish / #9. The Bride of Re-Animator / #10. A Bay of Blood / #11. The Seventh Victim / #12. The Fly (1958) / #13. The Fly (1986) / #14. Deep Red

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